Flight Test Safety Database - Unavailable for Updates

I wish to thank you all for your support of the Flight Test Safety Database.  The database website will be unavailable after Friday, 25 May, for approximately two months for some needed updates.  I will still have access to the database and if you have a data need please email me at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and I will try to satisfy your need. SETP or SFTE staff will notify you when the database is available.  I apologize for this interruption in service and greatly appreciate your patience in this matter.

Respectfully, 

Bart Henwood
FTSD Manager

New Flight Test Safety Committee Chairman Announced

At the conclusion of the Flight Test Safety Workshop in May, Mr. Jerry Whites announced that after five years of service, he would be stepping down as Committee Chairman. Whites will remain on the Committee and has "passed the stick" onto Mr. Tom Huff.

FTSC Jerry Tom 2017

(L-R) Jerry Whites and New FTSC Chairman Tom Huff

Checklists to Enhance Safety Article

Please click here to read an article by our recent 2017 Flight Test Safety Workshop Tutorial presenters, William Higgins and Daniel Boorman.

Or you may download the full detailed article here.

 

High Altitude Testing

Many, if not most, FAA Part 25 (Transport) aircraft want to get certified for high altitude airport operations. These operations put challenges on the aircraft in various ways that need to be tested and certified. This includes mainly pressurization systems and engine operations (starting and thermal issues). The FAA allows for 3000’ extrapolation of flight test data. The highest commercial airport is approximately 14,500’ so testing is desired at 11,500 or above. A commonly used major airport test location is at La Paz, Bolivia (13,325’). Testing at high altitudes presents some unique safety issues, mainly physiological, that I will discuss below.

FTSC's response to NTSB's report

In 2012 the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) published its final report on the Gulfstream G-650 accident.   The Flight Test Safety Committee (FTSC) was requested to respond to the NTSB’s recommendations from that report.  Here is the response from the FTSC.